2017 National Book Award Longlists Unveiled

Book award season enters high gear as the National Book Award finalists have been released in a series of four longlists consisting of ten books apiece. Five finalists in each category will be announced on October 4, and winners will be announced in New York City on November 15. The fiction list includes an eclectic mix and features eight women, including Jennifer Egan for her long-awaited new novel. You read about nearly all of the books on the Fiction longlist here first, of course, as they appeared in our indispensable first-half and second-half previews. Here’s a list of the finalists in all four categories with bonus links and excerpts where available: Fiction: Dark at the Crossing by Elliot Ackerman(excerpt) The King Is Always Above the People: Stories by Daniel Alarcón  Miss Burma by Charmaine Craig (excerpt) Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan (Egan's Year in Reading) The Leavers by Lisa Ko (excerpt) Pachinko by Min Jin Lee (People Without a Home: On Min Jin Lee’s Pachinko) Her Body and Other Parties: Stories by Carmen Maria Machado  A Kind of Freedom by Margaret Wilkerson Sexton (excerpt) Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward ("Haunted by Ghosts: The Millions Interviews Jesmyn Ward", "Literature’s Inherited Trauma: On Jesmyn Ward’s Sing, Unburied, Sing") Barren Island by Carol Zoref Nonfiction: Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge by Erica Armstrong Dunbar (excerpt) The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America by Frances FitzGerald (excerpt) Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman, Jr. (excerpt) The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia by Masha Gessen (read our interview with Gessen) Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the F.B.I. by David Grann (excerpt) No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump’s Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need by Naomi Klein (excerpt) Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America by Nancy MacLean (read our interview with MacLean) The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (excerpt) The Blood of Emmett Till by Timothy B. Tyson (excerpt) Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, and Fake News by Kevin Young Poetry: Half-Light: Collected Poems 1965-2016 by Frank Bidart When I Grow Up I Want to Be a List of Further Possibilities by Chen Chen The Book of Endings by Leslie Harrison Magdalene by Marie Howe Where Now: New and Selected Poems by Laura Kasischke Whereas by Layli Long Soldier (Nick Ripatrazone on Layli Long Soldier) In the Language of My Captor by Shane McCrae Square Inch Hours by Sherod Santos Don’t Call Us Dead by Danez Smith (Nick Ripatrazone on Danez Smith; excerpt) Afterland by Mai Der Vang Young People's Literature: What Girls Are Made Of by Elana K. Arnold Far from the Tree by Robin Benway All the Wind in the World by Samantha Mabry You Bring the Distant Near by Mitali Perkins Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sánchez Orphan Island by Laurel Snyder The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (excerpt) Clayton Byrd Goes Underground by Rita Williams-Garcia American Street by Ibi Zoboi

Booker Prize Offers Up Eclectic 2017 Shortlist

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The Booker Prize has whittled down its longlist to an intriguing shortlist, and none of the authors tapped has previously won the Prize. This year, three Americans make the shortlist: Paul Auster, George Saunders, and Emily Fridlund. They are joined by the UK's Ali Smith and Fiona Mozley, and UK/Pakistani writer Mohsin Hamid. The bookies suggest that Saunders is the favorite to win. All the Booker Prize shortlisters are below (with bonus links where available): 4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster (Free Speech Is a Black-and-White Issue: The Millions Interviews Paul Auster) History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund (A Classic Nightmare: On Emily Fridlund’s History of Wolves) Exit West by Mohsin Hamid (The World-Spanning Humanism of Mohsin Hamid) Elmet by Fiona Mozley Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders (In the Between: Lincoln in the Bardo) Autumn by Ali Smith (Wordsmith: The Beguiling Gifts of Ali Smith)

The Booker’s Dozen: The 2017 Booker Longlist

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In the fourth year that the Booker Prize has been open to U.S. authors, four American authors again make the longlist, including National Book Award and Pulitzer-winner Colson Whithead. Arundhati Roy is the lone former winner on the list. Notable names like George Saunders, Paul Auster, Zadie Smith and Mohsin Hamid make for formidable competition alongside three debut novels. All the Booker Prize longlisters are below (with bonus links where available): 4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster (Free Speech Is a Black-and-White Issue: The Millions Interviews Paul Auster) Days Without End by Sebastian Barry History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund (A Classic Nightmare: On Emily Fridlund’s History of Wolves) Exit West by Mohsin Hamid (The World-Spanning Humanism of Mohsin Hamid) Solar Bones by Mike McCormack Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor Elmet by Fiona Mozley The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders (In the Between: Lincoln in the Bardo) Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie Autumn by Ali Smith (Wordsmith: The Beguiling Gifts of Ali Smith) Swing Time by Zadie Smith (Nameless and Undefined: On Zadie Smith’s Swing Time) Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead (Scars That Never Fade: On Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad)

And the Winners of the 2017 Best Translated Book Awards Are…

The 10th annual Best Translated Book Awards were announced this evening at The Folly in New York City. Lúcio Cardoso’s Chronicle of the Murdered House, translated from the Portuguese by Margaret Jull Costa and Robin Patterson, won for fiction, and Alejandra Pizarnik’s Extracting the Stone of Madness, translated by Yvette Siegert, won for poetry (read our review here). With four books on the Best Translated Book Award Fiction longlist, Margaret Jull Costa had pretty good odds that one of her projects would win the prize. This is the first time Jull Costa, Robin Patterson, and Open Letter Books have received the award. According to BTBA judge Jeremy Garber (Powell’s Books), “Though it took longer than 50 years to finally appear in English, Lúcio Cardoso’s Chronicle of the Murdered House was well worth the wait. Epic in scope and stunning in its execution, the late Brazilian author’s 1959 masterpiece is a resounding accomplishment. Thanks to the translational prowess of Margaret Jull Costa and Robin Patterson, Cardoso’s saga of familial scheming and salacious scandal deservingly comes to an even wider audience.” Fellow judge Mark Haber (Brazos Bookstore) adds “Chronicle has hints of Dostoevsky, García Márquez, and William Faulkner, yet the DNA is wholly Cardoso's, who was not only a friend, but a mentor to Clarice Lispector. This novel is not only beautifully written and strangely profound, but a joy to read. The dramas of a prestigious family in a provincial Brazilian jungle, complete with gossip, backstabbing, cross-dressing and suicide attempts all take place beneath a single roof. There’s a fully-formed universe in this run-down mansion rotting away in the woods. Chronicle of the Murdered House is a novel about family, trust, madness, betrayal, human nature, all heavy themes really, yet handled with aplomb. . . . Its translation feels long overdue.” Extracting the Stone of Madness is the fourth collection of Alejandra Pizarnik’s to be translated by Yvette Siegert, but the first to win the Best Translated Book Award. It is published by New Directions -- which has won the BTBA on three past occasions, twice for fiction, once for poetry -- and collects all of Pizarnik’s middle and late works, including some posthumous pieces. Judge Emma Ramadan (Riffraff Bookstore) said, “The judges were extremely impressed by Donald Nicholson- Smith's translation of Abdellatif Laâbi's In Praise of Defeat, but ultimately chose Yvette Siegert's translation of Alejandra Pizarnik's Extracting the Stone of Madness as this year's poetry winner. It's a book screaming and barking with jagged solitude and beautiful pain, each poem's broken melody attempting to fill a void we can all see lurking. Yvette Siegert perfectly inhabits Pizarnik's tortuous, vivid world and allows us to do the same.” For the sixth year in a row, the winning books will receive $10,000 each (split equally between the authors and translators) thanks to funding from the Amazon Literary Partnership. Over this period, the Amazon Literary Partnership has contributed more than $120,000 to international authors and their translators through the BTBA. “By sharing new voices with English-language readers, the Best Translated Book Awards highlight literary excellence from around the globe while also shrinking the world a bit, fostering empathy through storytelling,” said Neal Thompson, Amazon’s Director of Author and Publishing Relations. “The Amazon Literary Partnership is proud to continue its support of the diverse voices of BTBA’s international authors and their translators.” Nine judges served on this year’s fiction jury: Trevor Berrett (The Mookse and the Gripes), Monica Carter (Salonica World Lit), Rachel Cordasco (Speculative Fiction in Translation), Jennifer Croft (translator, co-founder of the Buenos Aires Review), Lori Feathers (Interabang Books), Jeremy Garber (Powell’s Books), Mark Haber (writer, Brazos Bookstore), George Henson (World Literature Today, Latin American Literature Today, University of Oklahoma), and Steph Opitz (Marie Claire). The poetry jury was made up of: Jarrod Annis (Greenlight Bookstore), Katrine Øgaard Jensen (EuropeNow), Tess Lewis (writer and translator), Becka McKay (writer and translator), and Emma Ramadan (translator, Riffraff Bookstore). Past winners of the fiction award include: Signs Preceding the End of the World by Yuri Herrera, translated from the Spanish by Lisa Dillman; The Last Lover by Can Xue, translated from the Chinese by Annelise Finegan Wasmoen; Seiobo There Below and Satantango, both by László Krasznahorkai, and translated from the Hungarian by Ottilie Mulzet and George Szirtes respectively; Stone Upon Stone by Wiesław Myśliwski, translated from the Polish by Bill Johnston; and The True Deceiver by Tove Jansson, translated from the Swedish by Thomas Teal. In terms of the poetry award, past winners include: Rilke Shake by Angélica Freitas, translated from the Portuguese by Hilary Kaplan; Diorama by Rocío Cerón, translated from the Spanish by Anna Rosenwong; The Guest in the Wood by Elisa Biagini, translated from the Italian by Diana Thow, Sarah Stickney, and Eugene Ostashevsky; Wheel with a Single Spoke by Nichita Stănescu, translated from the Romanian by Sean Cotter; and Spectacle & Pigsty by Kiwao Nomura, translated from the Japanese by Kyoko Yoshida and Forrest Gander. For more information, visit Three Percent, the BTBA site and Facebook page, and follow the award on Twitter.

The Man Booker International Prize Shortlist

Last year, the Man Booker International Prize evolved from its previous iteration and joined forces with the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize to award £50,000 to a single work of fiction in translation, split between the author and translator (Han Kang and translator Deborah Smith took home the 2016 honors for The Vegetarian). This year's shortlist is below -- find more details about the titles here. Mathias Énard (France), Compass, translated by Charlotte Mandell (Fitzcarraldo Editions) David Grossman (Israel), A Horse Walks Into a Bar, translated by Jessica Cohen (Jonathan Cape) Roy Jacobsen (Norway), The Unseen, translated by Don Bartlett and Don Shaw (Maclehose) Dorthe Nors (Denmark), Mirror Shoulder Signal, translated by Misha Hoekstra (Pushkin Press) Amos Oz (Israel), Judas, translated by Nicholas de Lange (Chatto & Windus) Samanta Schweblin (Argentina), Fever Dream, translated by Megan McDowell (Oneworld)

The 2017 BTBA Finalists for Fiction and Poetry

Last month, we unveiled the longlists for the Best Translated Book Awards (BTBA), an award founded by Three Percent that comes with a $5,000 prize for author and translator alike. Below, behold the finalists. The winner will be announced at a ceremony in New York and at The Millions on May 4. For more information on the award, its history, the judges, etc., please visit the official Best Translated Book Award site and the official BTBA Facebook page, and follow the award on Twitter. Best Translated Book Award 2017: Fiction Finalists Wicked Weeds by Pedro Cabiya, translated from the Spanish by Jessica Powell (Dominican Republic, Mandel Vilar Press) Chronicle of the Murdered House by Lúcio Cardoso, translated from the Portuguese by Margaret Jull Costa and Robin Patterson (Brazil, Open Letter Books) Eve Out of Her Ruins by Ananda Devi, translated from the French by Jeffrey Zuckerman (Mauritius, Deep Vellum) Zama by Antonio di Benedetto, translated from the Spanish by Esther Allen (Argentina, New York Review Books) Doomi Golo by Boubacar Boris Diop, translated from the Wolof by Vera Wülfing-Leckie and El Hadji Moustapha Diop (Senegal, Michigan State University Press) War and Turpentine by Stefan Hertmans, translated from the Dutch by David McKay (Belgium, Pantheon) Umami by Laia Jufresa, translated from the Spanish by Sophie Hughes (Mexico, Oneworld) Oblivion by Sergi Lebedev, translated from the Russian by Antonina W. Bouis (Russia, New Vessel Press) Ladivine by Marie NDiaye, translated from the French by Jordan Stump (France, Knopf) Among Strange Victims by Daniel Saldaña Paris, translated from the Spanish by Christina MacSweeney (Mexico, Coffee House Press)       Best Translated Book Award 2017: Poetry Finalists Berlin-Hamlet by Szilárd Borbély, translated from the Hungarian by Ottilie Mulzet (Hungary, New York Review Books) Of Things by Michael Donhauser, translated from the German by Nick Hoff and Andrew Joron (Austria, Burning Deck Press) Cheer Up, Femme Fatale by Yideum Kim, translated from the Korean by Ji Yoon Lee, Don Mee Choi, and Johannes Göransson (South Korea, Action Books) In Praise of Defeat by Abdellatif Laâbi, translated from the French by Donald Nicholson-Smith (Morocco, Archipelago Books) Extracting the Stone of Madness by Alejandra Pizarnik, translated from the Spanish by Yvette Siegert (Argentina, New Directions) (read our review)  

The 2017 International DUBLIN Literary Award Shortlist

The International DUBLIN Literary Award (formerly known as the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award) is the world’s most valuable annual literary award for a single work of fiction published in English, clocking in at €100,000. Now in its 22nd year, the award is sponsored by the Dublin City Council and managed by the city's libraries. This year's titles were nominated by public libraries in Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Croatia, Denmark, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Scotland, Sweden and the USA, according to the award's website. The shortlisted titles are: A General Theory of Oblivion by José Eduardo Agualusa, translated from the Portuguese by Daniel Hahn Confession of the Lioness by Mia Couto, translated from the Portuguese by David Brookshaw The Green Road by Anne Enright The Prophets of Eternal Fjord by Kim Leine, translated from the Danish by Martin Aitken The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli, translated from the Spanish by  Christina MacSweeney The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen Under the Udala Trees by Chinelo Okparanta A Strangeness in My Mind by Orhan Pamuk, translated from the Turkish by Ekin Oklap A Whole Life by Robert Seethaler, translated from the German by Charlotte Collins A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara 

The 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction Goes to Colson Whitehead

  The Pulitzer jury named Colson Whitehead's The Underground Railroad this year's winner in the fiction category. Here are this year's Pulitzer winners and finalists with bonus links: Fiction: Winner: The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead (Millions review) Imagine Me Gone by Adam Haslett The Sport of Kings by C. E. Morgan     General Nonfiction: Winner: Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond In a Different Key: The Story of Autism by John Donvan and Caren Zucker The Politics of Mourning: Death and Honor in Arlington National Cemetery by Micki McElya   History: Winner: Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy by Heather Ann Thompson Brothers at Arms: American Independence and the Men of France and Spain Who Saved It by Larrie D. Ferreiro New England Bound: Slavery and Colonization in Early America by Wendy Warren   Biography or Autobiography: Winner: The Return: Fathers, Sons and the Land in Between by Hisham Matar In the Darkroom by Susan Faludi When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi (Millions review)   Poetry: Winner: Olio by Tyehimba Jess Collected Poems: 1950-2012 by Adrienne Rich XX: Poems for the Twentieth Century by Campbell McGrath   Winners and finalists in other categories are available at the Pulitzer Web site.

Announcing the 2017 BTBA Longlists for Fiction and Poetry

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Listed below are the 35 titles on this year’s Best Translated Book Award longlists for fiction and poetry -- the 10th time that these lists have been released. And the sixth year in which, thanks to an Amazon Literary Partnership, the winning authors and translators will each receive $5,000 cash prizes. Founded in 2008 by Three Percent at the University or Rochester, the award has grown exponentially over the past 10 years. The focus on finding the best books in translation from the past year has been constant, but the pool of eligible titles has expanded from 360 in 2008 to more than 600 for this year’s award. For these longlists, the 14 judges -- nine for fiction, five for poetry -- considered works written by authors from 87 countries in 54 different languages, and published in English by 179 distinct presses. This increase in the number of books coming out is incredibly impressive, but so is the fact that so many more translators are getting their works published in comparison to a few years back. Reflecting that, of the 40 translators included on these longlists, 29 (73 percent) are receiving this honor for the first time ever. In short, it’s an exciting time for international literature, and the breadth and diversity of these longlists reflect that. From established authors like Javier Marías to new voices like Basma Abdel Aziz, from works of speculative fiction like Wicked Weeds to family sagas from Senegal like Doomi Golo, there’s something on here for every type of reader. To help you find the books that you most want to read, Three Percent will be running short “Why This Book Should Win the BTBA” posts for all 35 titles over the next few weeks as we build up to the announcement of the finalists on Tuesday, April 18. (Also right here at The Millions.) For more information on the award, it’s history, the judges, etc., please visit the official Best Translated Book Award site and the official BTBA Facebook page, and follow the award on Twitter. Best Translated Book Award 2017: Fiction Longlist The Queue by Basma Abdel Aziz, translated from the Arabic by Elisabeth Jaquette (Egypt, Melville House) (read Abdel Aziz's Year in Reading) The Young Bride by Alessandro Baricco, translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein (Italy, Europa Editions) Wicked Weeds by Pedro Cabiya, translated from the Spanish by Jessica Powell (Dominican Republic, Mandel Vilar Press) Chronicle of the Murdered House by Lúcio Cardoso, translated from the Portuguese by Margaret Jull Costa and Robin Patterson (Brazil, Open Letter Books) On the Edge by Rafael Chirbes, translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa (Spain, New Directions) Eve Out of Her Ruins by Ananda Devi, translated from the French by Jeffrey Zuckerman (Mauritius, Deep Vellum) Zama by Antonio di Benedetto, translated from the Spanish by Esther Allen (Argentina, New York Review Books) A Spare Life by Lidija Dimkovska, translated from the Macedonian by Christina Kramer (Macedonia, Two Lines Press) Doomi Golo by Boubacar Boris Diop, translated from the Wolof by Vera Wülfing-Leckie and El Hadji Moustapha Diop (Senegal, Michigan State University Press) Night Prayers by Santiago Gamboa, translated from the Spanish by Howard Curtis (Colombia, Europa Editions) Angel of Oblivion by Maja Haderlap, translated from the German by Tess Lewis (Germany, Archipelago Books) (read our review) War and Turpentine by Stefan Hertmans, translated from the Dutch by David McKay (Belgium, Pantheon) Umami by Laia Jufresa, translated from the Spanish by Sophie Hughes (Mexico, Oneworld) Last Wolf and Herman by László Krasznahorkai, translated from the Hungarian by George Szirtes and John Batki (Hungary, New Directions) Oblivion by Sergi Lebedev, translated from the Russian by Antonina W. Bouis (Russia, New Vessel Press) Thus Bad Begins by Javier Marías, translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa (Spain, Knopf) In the Café of Lost Youth by Patrick Modiano, translated from the French by Chris Clarke (France, New York Review Books) Ladivine by Marie NDiaye, translated from the French by Jordan Stump (France, Knopf) Among Strange Victims by Daniel Saldaña Paris, translated from the Spanish by Christina MacSweeney (Mexico, Coffee House Press) Moonstone by Sjón, translated from the Icelandic by Victoria Cribb (Iceland, FSG) Memoirs of a Polar Bear by Yoko Tawada, translated from the German by Susan Bernofsky (Japan, New Directions) Vampire in Love by Enrique Vila-Matas, translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa (Spain, New Directions) My Marriage by Jakob Wassermann, translated from the German by Michael Hofmann (Germany, New York Review Books) Moshi Moshi by Banana Yoshimoto, translated from the Japanese by Asa Yoneda (Japan, Counterpoint Press) Super Extra Grande by Yoss, translated from the Spanish by David Frye (Cuba, Restless Books) Best Translated Book Award 2017: Poetry Longlist Berlin-Hamlet by Szilárd Borbély, translated from the Hungarian by Ottilie Mulzet (Hungary, New York Review Books) Of Things by Michael Donhauser, translated from the German by Nick Hoff and Andrew Joron (Austria, Burning Deck Press) Instructions Within by Ashraf Fayadh, translated from the Arabic by Mona Kareem, Mona Zaki, and Jonathan Wright (Palestine, The Operating System) Cheer Up, Femme Fatale by Yideum Kim, translated from the Korean by Ji Yoon Lee, Don Mee Choi, and Johannes Göransson (South Korea, Action Books) In Praise of Defeat by Abdellatif Laâbi, translated from the French by Donald Nicholson-Smith (Morocco, Archipelago Books) Extracting the Stone of Madness by Alejandra Pizarnik, translated from the Spanish by Yvette Siegert (Argentina, New Directions) (read our review) Thief of Talant by Pierre Reverdy, translated from the French by Ian Seed (France, Wakefield Press) tasks by Víctor Rodríguez Núñez, translated from the Spanish by Katherine M. Hedeen (Cuba, co-im-press) Building the Barricade by Anna Świrszczyńska, translated from the Polish by Piotr Florczyk (Poland, Tavern Books) Antígona González by Sara Uribe, translated from the Spanish by John Pluecker (Mexico, Les Figues Press)      

NBCC 2016 Finalists, Leonard Prize, and Balakian Award Winners

The finalists for the annual National Book Critics Circle (NBCC) Award have been announced, offering up the customary shortlists of great fiction and nonfiction. In addition, the John Leonard Prize for best debut novel was awarded to Yaa Gyasi for Homegoing; the Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing went to Michelle Dean (check out her 2016 Year in Reading); and Margaret Atwood took home the Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award. The NBCC Award will be presented March 17 in a public ceremony. Fiction Michael Chabon, Moonglow (our interview with Chabon) Louise Erdrich, LaRose Adam Haslett, Imagine Me Gone Ann Patchett, Commonwealth  Zadie Smith, Swing Time (the author's Year in Reading; our review)   Nonfiction Matthew Desmond, Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City (Lisa Lucas and Imbolo Mbue on the book) Ibram X. Kendi, Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive Idea of Racist History of Racist Ideas in America  Jane Mayer, Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires behind the Rise of the Radical Right Viet Thanh Nguyen, Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War (edited by our own Zoë Ruiz!) John Edgar Wideman, Writing to Save a Life: The Louis Till File